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Re: [xsl] Evolution of XPath - XPath 3.0 (Review)


Subject: Re: [xsl] Evolution of XPath - XPath 3.0 (Review)
From: "Gustave Stresen-Reuter tedmasterweb@xxxxxxxxx" <xsl-list-service@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 06:54:53 -0000

Hank,

Thank you so much for letting me preview your course. I ran out of time to
get much beyond the first few chapters (pity) but it seems quite complete.
I wish you the best!

Ted Stresen-Reuter

On Wed, May 27, 2015 at 4:25 PM Dimitre Novatchev dnovatchev@xxxxxxxxx <
xsl-list-service@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> I want to thank Hank  Ratzesberger, and Jim Fuller for their extremely
> high evaluation of the XPath 3.0 course -- these can be found here:
>
>    http://www.pluralsight.com/courses/discussion/xpath-3-0-whats-new
>
> I want to assure you all that I will continue to do my best in future
> XSLT / XPath related courses and hope not to fall behind your already
> so high expectations.
>
> Thanks,
> Dimitre
>
>
> On Mon, May 25, 2015 at 10:44 PM, Hank Ratzesberger xml@xxxxxxxxxxxx
> <xsl-list-service@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> > Hello,
> >
> > You may recall that Dimitre Novatchev posted an invitation to review
> > training courses he created and published on Pluralsight.  I missed an
> > earlier invitation so was pleased to have another chance.
> >
> > Altogether, I'm excited by the new XPath features and it is much more
> > clear to me capabilities of functional programming to create reusable
> > code and solve problems with less code and fewer steps. If you are
> > able to watch this training course, especially if you want to "get
> > caught up" on the XPath 3.0 specification, I think you will find this
> > training course very helpful.
> >
> > In general, Evolution of XPath is rather superbly written, succinct
> > both in its spoken explanation and animation. I think we've all seen
> > our share of Powerpoint transitions and paused to contemplate the fate
> > of humanity, so I was impressed to see that the speech and
> > highlighting are so well timed that not a moment is wasted.  It comes
> > together quite nicely and at a good pace.
> >
> > I have considerable experience with XML, XSLT, XForms and XQuery but I
> > am not an expert and had not followed the 3.0 specification closely
> > because it was not within my current job's requirements. That said, I
> > found the content to be thorough and I believe all (or all important)
> > changes to the XPath specification are covered - it is a 4.5 hour
> > course.
> >
> > If I may now digress, you may have heard the adage, "If your only tool
> > is a hammer then every problem looks like a nail" and I once tweeted
> > (since no only simply remarks anymore) that, "If all you have are
> > nails, you can use a hammer, or rock or whatever is handy." And this
> > has been my feeling and experience with XML.  I'm not sure why the
> > trend has been to more and more generics in code, but generalizing
> > data to the same object model and serialized output (XML) is ... not
> > well understood or appreciated, it seems.
> >
> > Anyway, I've picked up some enthusiasm for XML programming and an
> > appreciation for the continued efforts of the standard writers and
> > programmers (and Dimitre).   Indeed, XML specification, parsers,
> > tools, object interfaces, binary file translators, etc. etc. are all
> > quite evolved making it a bit of a golden age for XML -- if only
> > programmers knew...
> >
> > http://www.pluralsight.com/search/?searchTerm=novatchev
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Hank
> >
> > --
> > Hank Ratzesberger
> > XMLWerks.com
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Cheers,
> Dimitre Novatchev
> ---------------------------------------
> Truly great madness cannot be achieved without significant intelligence.
> ---------------------------------------
> To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk
> -------------------------------------
> Never fight an inanimate object
> -------------------------------------
> To avoid situations in which you might make mistakes may be the
> biggest mistake of all
> ------------------------------------
> Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.
> -------------------------------------
> You've achieved success in your field when you don't know whether what
> you're doing is work or play
> -------------------------------------
> To achieve the impossible dream, try going to sleep.
> -------------------------------------
> Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.
> -------------------------------------
> Typing monkeys will write all Shakespeare's works in 200yrs.Will they
> write all patents, too? :)
> -------------------------------------
> Sanity is madness put to good use.
> -------------------------------------
> I finally figured out the only reason to be alive is to enjoy it.


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